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Opioid Addiction

Recent Advances in Detoxification and Maintenance Therapy

Summary

New pharmacological treatments for opioid dependence include detoxification agents such as clonidine and lofexidine, and maintenance agents such as levacetylmethadol (levo-α-acetylmethadol; LA AM) and buprenorphine. Detoxification from opioids has been facilitated by the development of clonidine, particularly in combination with naltrexone. New experimental approaches have also been tried to reduce the time that it takes to complete the process of detoxification or to further reduce residual withdrawal symptoms not completely relieved by clonidine. Maintenance on levacetylmethadol or buprenorphine has become a viable alternative to methadone maintenance and holds promise for the future.

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Correspondence to Alison H. Oliveto.

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Best, S.E., Oliveto, A.H. & Kosten, T.R. Opioid Addiction. CNS Drugs 6, 301–314 (1996). https://doi.org/10.2165/00023210-199606040-00005

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Keywords

  • Cocaine
  • Clonidine
  • Heroin
  • Buprenorphine
  • Naltrexone