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Sports Medicine

, Volume 22, Issue 4, pp 264–272 | Cite as

Evaluation of Shoulder Laxity

  • Edward G. McFarland
  • Brian M. Torpey
  • Leigh Ann Curl
Injury Clinic

Summary

An understanding of the anatomy and biomechanical features of the glenohumeral joint is necessary when understanding the concept of shoulder laxity. Glenohumeral laxity is a normal feature of shoulder motion, but only when that laxity becomes excessive does instability occur. The clinician must use the history and physical examination to distinguish normal from pathological laxity. Several examination techniques are commonly used to evaluate anterior, posterior, inferior, and multidirectional shoulder laxity. It has become appreciated that subluxation of the shoulder upon physical examination does not necessarily mean that the shoulder is clinically or symptomatically unstable. This paper reviews the current techniques to evaluate shoulder laxity and discusses the interpretation of these examinations as they relate to normal and pathological laxities.

Keywords

Rotator Cuff Humeral Head Glenohumeral Joint Posterior Translation Glenohumeral Ligament 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Adis International Limited 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edward G. McFarland
    • 1
  • Brian M. Torpey
    • 1
  • Leigh Ann Curl
    • 1
  1. 1.Section of Sports Medicine and Shoulder Surgery, Department of Orthopaedic SurgeryJohns Hopkins UniversityBaltimoreUSA

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