Weight-Training Injuries

Common Injuries and Preventative Methods

Summary

The use of weights is an increasingly popular conditioning technique, competitive sport and recreational activity among children, adolescents and young adults. Weight-training can cause significant musculoskeletal injuries such as fractures, dislocations, spondylolysis, spondylolisthesis, intervertebral disk herniation, and meniscal injuries of the knee. Although injuries can occur during the use of weight machines, most apparently happen during the aggressive use of free weights. Prepubescent and older athletes who are well trained and supervised appear to have low injury rates in strength training programmes. Good coaching and proper weightlifting techniques and other injury prevention methods are likely to minimise the number of musculoskeletal problems caused by weight-training.

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Correspondence to Dr Lynnette J. Mazur.

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Mazur, L.J., Yetman, R.J. & Risser, W.L. Weight-Training Injuries. Sports Medicine 16, 57–63 (1993). https://doi.org/10.2165/00007256-199316010-00005

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Keywords

  • Strength Training
  • Spondylolysis
  • Free Weight
  • Strength Training Programme
  • Consumer Product Safety Commission