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Sports Medicine

, Volume 16, Issue 1, pp 5–13 | Cite as

Blood Lactate Measurement in Recovery as an Adjunct to Training

Practical Considerations
  • Phillip Bishop
  • Mike Martino
Leading Article

Keywords

Lactate Blood Lactate Lactate Level Apply Physiology Lactate Threshold 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Adis International Limited 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Phillip Bishop
    • 1
  • Mike Martino
    • 1
  1. 1.Human Performance Laboratory, Department of Human Performance StudiesUniversity of AlabamaTuscaloosaUSA

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