Drugs

, Volume 49, Issue 3, pp 321–327 | Cite as

Microelectronic Systems for Monitoring and Enhancing Patient Compliance With Medication Regimens

  • Joyce A. Cramer
Leading Article

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References

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Copyright information

© Adis International Limited 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joyce A. Cramer
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Health Services Research, Department of Veterans AffairsVA Medical Center (116A)West HavenUSA
  2. 2.Department of NeurologyYale University School of MedicineNew HavenUSA

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