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Drugs & Aging

, Volume 7, Issue 3, pp 157–167 | Cite as

Potential of Antineoplastons in Diseases of Old Age

  • Stanislaw R. Burzynski
Leading Article

Keywords

Adis International Limited Aflatoxin Human Papilloma Virus Samid Phenylacetate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Adis International Limited 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stanislaw R. Burzynski
    • 1
  1. 1.Burzynski Research Institute, Inc.HoustonUSA

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