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Sports Medicine

, Volume 42, Issue 2, pp 135–152 | Cite as

A Between Sex Comparison of Anterior-Posterior Knee Laxity after Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction with Patellar Tendon or Hamstrings Autograft

A Systematic Review
  • Mark V. PaternoEmail author
  • Ashley M. Weed
  • Timothy E. Hewett
Review Article

Abstract

Anterior-posterior (AP) knee laxity after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction may differ between sexes for different graft types. Females may experience an increase in AP knee laxity following an ACL reconstruction with a hamstrings graft, which is not seen in males with a hamstrings graft or in males or females with a bone-patellar tendon-bone (BTB) graft. The hypothesis of this review is sex differences in AP knee laxity and this will be identified in patients who undergo an ACL reconstruction with a hamstrings graft, while no sex differences will be observed in patients who have an ACL reconstruction with a BTB graft.

A systematic search was performed in PubMed, CINAHL® and SPORTDiscus™. Inclusion criteria were articles published in the English language that studied human subjects who underwent an ACL reconstruction with a BTB or hamstrings autograft, and the presence of a sex comparison on outcome measures including side-to-side difference in AP knee laxity. Methodological quality was assessed using a Modified Coleman Methodology Score. Eleven cohort studies met the inclusion criteria. Six investigated sex differences in both hamstrings and BTB grafts. Three only investigated BTB grafts and two only investigated hamstrings grafts. These studies consistently reported increases in AP knee laxity in females after an ACL reconstruction with a hamstrings graft that was not observed in the other cohorts. This systematic review indicates that female patients have greater AP knee laxity following an ACL reconstruction with a hamstrings autograft compared with males with a similar procedure, and both females and males following an ACL reconstruction with a BTB autograft. These results are derived from lower level evidence, as no randomized control trials have attempted to answer this question. Future studies need to rigorously address this clinical question to confirm the results currently in the literature.

Keywords

Anterior Cruciate Ligament Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Patellar Tendon Knee Laxity Hamstring Graft 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Adis Data Information BV 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mark V. Paterno
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Ashley M. Weed
    • 5
  • Timothy E. Hewett
    • 1
    • 2
    • 4
    • 6
    • 7
  1. 1.Sports Health and Performance InstituteThe Ohio State University Medical CenterColumbusUSA
  2. 2.Research Foundation Sports Medicine Biodynamics Center and Human Performance LaboratoryCincinnati Children’s HospitalCincinnatiUSA
  3. 3.Division of Occupational and Physical TherapyCincinnati Children’s HospitalCincinnatiUSA
  4. 4.Department of PediatricsUniversity of Cincinnati College of MedicineCincinnatiUSA
  5. 5.Ohio Orthopedic Center of ExcellenceUpper ArlingtonUSA
  6. 6.Departments of Physiology and Cell Biology, Orthopaedic Surgery and Biomedical Engineering, and Family MedicineThe Ohio State UniversityColumbusUSA
  7. 7.Division of Molecular Cardiovascular BiologyCincinnati Children’s Hospital Research FoundationCincinnatiUSA

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