Drug Safety

, Volume 34, Issue 10, pp 883–1026

International Society of Pharmacovigilance Abstracts 11th ISoP Annual Meeting ‘Next Stop: Istanbul — Bridging the Continents!’ Istanbul, Turkey 26–28 October 2011

International Societyofpharmacovigilance
Abstracts

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