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Clinical Drug Investigation

, Volume 31, Issue 10, pp 675–689 | Cite as

Pirlindole in the Treatment of Depression and Fibromyalgia Syndrome

  • Jaime C. Branco
  • Ana Maria Tomé
  • Manuel R. Cruz
  • Augusto Filipe
Review Article

Abstract

Depression and fibromyalgia syndrome are debilitating chronic conditions that impose a significant burden on individuals, families and society. Both depression and fibromyalgia have many overlapping symptoms, and antidepressants of several classes are among recommended treatment options for patients with fibromyalgia syndrome. Pirlindole is a selective and reversible inhibitor of monoamine oxidase (MAO) subtype A (MAO-A) that is approved in some European and non-European countries for the treatment of depression. The antidepressant efficacy and safety of pirlindole have been demonstrated in a number of placebo- and active comparator-controlled studies and are supported by many years of clinical experience in the treatment of depression. The drug’s efficacy and safety have also been demonstrated, more recently, in the treatment of fibromyalgia syndrome. Pirlindole has a favourable tolerability profile, with no deleterious effect on cardiovascular dynamics. The effect of pirlindole on sensorimotor performance relevant to driving a motor vehicle is similar to that of placebo, as pirlindole appears to have an activating rather than a sedating antidepressant profile. Because of its specific and reversible inhibition of MAO-A and relatively short elimination half-life, no tyramine or ‘cheese’ effect is likely after short or long-term administration. The available evidence supports pirlindole as a safe and effective treatment option for the management of depression and fibromyalgia syndrome.

Keywords

Fibromyalgia Amitriptyline Beck Depression Inventory Moclobemide Hamilton Depression Rate Scale 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgements

Jaime C. Branco has been a consultant and investigator in clinical trials conducted by Pierre-Fabre, is an investigator in clinical trials by Bial, and has participated in Pfizer’s and Lilly’s international advisory boards. Manuel R. Cruz has acted as Director of the Forensic Psychiatry Service and is a member of the Portuguese Group of Psychiatry Consilii (GPPCL), for which he is also a liaison officer, and the Portuguese Association Gerontopsiquiatria (APG). Augusto Filipe and Ana Maria Tomé are employees of Grupo Tecnimede, the company that markets pirlindole in Portugal.

We thank Liliana Coelho for assistance in the management of the manuscript preparation and bibliographic research. We also thank Ray Hill of inScience Communications, a Wolters Kluwer business, who provided medical writing support funded by Grupo Tecnimede, Sintra, Portugal.

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Copyright information

© Adis Data Information BV 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jaime C. Branco
    • 1
    • 2
  • Ana Maria Tomé
    • 3
    • 4
  • Manuel R. Cruz
    • 5
  • Augusto Filipe
    • 3
  1. 1.CEDOCFaculdade de Ciências Médicas da Universidade Nova de LisboaLisbonPortugal
  2. 2.Serviço de Reumatologia do CHLOEPE/Hospital Egas MonizLisbonPortugal
  3. 3.Medical Department, Grupo TecnimedeZona Industrial da AbrunheiraSintraPortugal
  4. 4.Faculty of Life SciencesUniversity of HertfordshireHatfieldUK
  5. 5.Centro Hospitalar Psiquiátrico de LisboaLisbonPortugal

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