CNS Drugs

, Volume 25, Issue 7, pp 539–554 | Cite as

Long-Term Outcomes with Medications for Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

Current Status of Knowledge
Leading Article

Abstract

Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), a common neuro-behavioural disorder characterized by inattention, hyperactivity and impulsivity, is a chronic disorder and often persists into adulthood. CNS stimulants have been the most well known treatment for ADHD for several decades due to their high effectiveness, good safety profiles and relatively minor adverse effects. Non-stimulant agents, including atomoxetine, extended-release guanfacine and extended-release clonidine (US FDA approved), and several non-FDA-approved agents, such as bupropion and tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs), were recently proven to be effective alternatives to the stimulants in several open-label and placebo-controlled trials. However, most medication trials for ADHD have been short term and thus have not provided information on the long-term outcomes of ADHD treatment. Since the medical treatment of many children with ADHD, especially those with more severe symptoms or co-morbid disorders, has to be continued for several years, recent studies have shifted their focus from the acute effectiveness of stimulants or non-stimulant drugs to the long-term outcomes of medications for ADHD. Evidence has shown that stimulants, along with the non-stimulants atomoxetine and extended-release guanfacine, are continuously effective for 24-month treatment periods with few and tolerable adverse effects.

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors declare no conflicts of interest and no financial support.

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Copyright information

© Adis Data Information BV 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Child Psychiatry and Sleep CenterChang Gung Memorial HospitalTaoyuan, TaiwanR.O.C.
  2. 2.College of MedicineChang Gung UniversityTaoyuan, TaiwanR.O.C.
  3. 3.Divisions of Pediatric Neonatology and Hematology/Oncology, Department of PediatricsChang Gung Memorial HospitalYunlinTaiwan R.O.C.
  4. 4.Chang Gung Institute of TechnologyChiayi, TaiwanR.O.C.

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