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Drugs

, Volume 70, Issue 17, pp 2201–2214 | Cite as

Drugs in Development for Tuberculosis

  • Ann M. Ginsberg
Leading Article

Abstract

Tuberculosis (TB) drug research and development efforts have resurged in the past 10 years to meet urgent medical needs, but enormous challenges remain. These urgent needs are largely driven by the current long and arduous multidrug regimens, which have significant safety, tolerability and compliance issues; rising and disturbing rates of multidrug- and extensively drug-resistant TB; the existence of approximately 2 billion individuals already latently infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative pathogen of TB; and a global TB-HIV co-epidemic. Stakeholders in TB drug development are moving to enable and streamline development and registration of novel, multidrug treatment regimens, comprised of multiple new chemical entities with novel mechanisms of action that do not demonstrate cross-resistance to current first- and second-line TB drugs. Ideally, these new regimens will ultimately provide a short, simple treatment suitable for essentially all TB patients, whether sensitive or resistant to the current anti-TB agents, whether HIV-positive or -negative, and irrespective of patient age.

This article reviews the challenges faced by those trying to develop these novel regimens and the key agents currently in clinical testing for TB; the latter are organized for discussion into three categories: (i) novel drugs (TMC207, SQ109, sudoterb [LL3858]); (ii) present first-line TB drugs being re-evaluated to optimize their efficacy (rifampicin, rifapentine); and (iii) currently licensed drugs for other indications and ‘next-generation’ compounds of the same chemical class being repurposed for TB (gatifloxacin and moxifloxacin; linezolid, PNU100480 and AZD5847; metronidazole, OPC-67683 and PA-824).

Keywords

Linezolid Moxifloxacin Gatifloxacin Rifamycin Rifapentine 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgements

Dr Ginsberg is a full-time employee of the not-for-profit, 501(c)3, Global Alliance for TB Drug Development (TB Alliance). She received no external funding or support for the preparation of this manuscript. The TB Alliance is the sponsor of or otherwise involved in the development of a number of drugs described in this article. The author thanks her colleagues at the TB Alliance for many helpful discussions on TB drug R&D.

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Copyright information

© Adis Data Information BV 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Global Alliance for TB Drug DevelopmentNew YorkUSA

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