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The Role of Tetracyclines in Rosacea

Abstract

There is a great deal of evidence to support the use of tetracycline and doxycycline in the treatment of papulopustular rosacea. Nevertheless, these agents have shared and unique adverse effects and relative contraindications. Recently, subantimicrobial-dose doxycycline was demonstrated to be an effective treatment for rosacea, due to its inherent anti-inflammatory properties. Furthermore, subantimicrobial-dose doxycycline has a more preferable tolerability profile and a lower occurrence of bacterial resistance than traditional-dose doxycycline. To further elucidate the role of tetracycline agents in rosacea, clinical trials that compare these agents with each other as well as with other effective rosacea treatments are called for. Adherence studies comparing oral tetracycline treatment with topical metronidazole treatment may also enhance clinical decision making.

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Acknowledgments

Dr Alikhan and Dr Kurek both contributed equally to this manuscript. No sources of funding were used to assist in the preparation of this review. Dr Feldman has received speaking, consulting and grant support from Galderma Laboratories. Drs Alikhan and Kurek have no conflicts of interest that are directly relevant to the content of this review.

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Correspondence to Dr Ali Alikhan.

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Alikhan, A., Kurek, L. & Feldman, S.R. The Role of Tetracyclines in Rosacea. Am J Clin Dermatol 11, 79–87 (2010). https://doi.org/10.2165/11530200-000000000-00000

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Keywords

  • Tetracycline
  • Doxycycline
  • Rosacea
  • Azelaic Acid
  • Oral Tetracycline