Pediatric Drugs

, Volume 12, Issue 4, pp 213–221

Mometasone Furoate in Children with Mild to Moderate Persistent Asthma

A Review of the Evidence
Review Article

Abstract

The high prevalence of asthma in pediatric patients underscores the need for effective and safe treatment in this population. Current treatment guidelines recommend inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) as a preferred treatment for the control of mild to moderate persistent asthma in patients of all ages, including young children. Clinical efficacy, systemic safety, and ease of use are desirable attributes of an ICS used to treat children with persistent asthma. Recently, mometasone furoate administered via a dry powder inhaler (MF-DPI) 110 μg once daily in the evening (delivered dose of 100 μg) was approved by the US FDA for the maintenance treatment of asthma in children 4–11 years of age.

Data from the clinical trial program for MF-DPI that establish the efficacy, long-term safety, and absence of systemic effects of the approved dosage in children with mild to moderate persistent asthma are reviewed. These findings indicate that once-daily dosing of MF-DPI in children aged 4–11 years significantly improves lung function and health-related quality of life while reducing rescue medication use and exacerbations despite previous treatment with other ICSs. MF-DPI is also well tolerated in children. Clinical trial results showed that, at the approved dosage, there are no effects on growth velocity or the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Results of pediatric studies are consistent with the clinical development program for adults and adolescents. In addition, once-daily dosing, established safety, and ease of use of MF-DPI may help to improve asthma management by addressing issues that inhibit proper adherence.

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Copyright information

© Adis Data Information BV 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.National Jewish Medical and Research CenterUniversity of Colorado Health Sciences CenterDenverUSA
  2. 2.National Jewish HealthUniversity of Colorado, Denver School of MedicineDenverUSA

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