American Journal of Clinical Dermatology

, Volume 12, Issue 6, pp 407–420 | Cite as

Adapalene 0.1%/Benzoyl Peroxide 2.5% Gel

A Review of its Use in the Treatment of Acne Vulgaris in Patients Aged ≥12 Years
Adis Drug Evaluation

Abstract

Adapalene 0.1%/benzoyl peroxide 2.5% gel (Epiduo™, Tactuo™) is the only fixed-dose combination product available that combines a topical retinoid with benzoyl peroxide; it targets three of the four main pathophysiologic factors in acne. This article reviews the therapeutic efficacy and tolerability of topical adapalene 0.1%/benzoyl peroxide 2.5% gel in the treatment of patients aged ≥ 12 years with acne vulgaris, as well as summarizing its pharmacologic properties.

In three 12-week trials in patients aged ≥12 years with moderate acne, success rates were significantly higher with adapalene 0.1%/benzoyl peroxide 2.5% gel than with adapalene 0.1% gel or benzoyl peroxide 2.5% gel alone, and combination therapy had an earlier onset of action. In addition, significantly greater reductions in total, inflammatory, and noninflammatory lesion counts were seen in patients receiving adapalene 0.1%/benzoyl peroxide 2.5% gel than in those receiving adapalene 0.1% gel or benzoyl peroxide 2.5% gel alone.

Adapalene 0.1%/benzoyl peroxide 2.5% gel did not significantly differ from clindamycin 1%/benzoyl peroxide 5% gel in terms of the reduction in the inflammatory, noninflammatory, or total lesion counts in patients with mild to moderate acne, according to the results of a 12-week trial.

Twelve-week studies showed that topical adapalene 0.1%/benzoyl peroxide 2.5% gel in combination with oral lymecycline was more effective than oral lymecycline alone in patients with moderate to severe acne, and topical adapalene 0.1%/benzoyl peroxide 2.5% gel in combination with oral doxycycline hyclate was more effective than oral doxycycline hyclate alone in patients with severe acne.

In patients with severe acne who responded to 12 weeks’ therapy with topical adapalene 0.1%/benzoyl peroxide 2.5% gel plus oral doxycycline hyclate or oral doxycycline hyclate alone, an additional 6 months’ therapy with adapalene 0.1%/benzoyl peroxide 2.5% gel was more effective than vehicle gel at maintaining response, with further improvement seen in adapalene 0.1%/benzoyl peroxide 2.5% gel recipients. A noncomparative study also demonstrated the efficacy of 12 months’ therapy with adapalene 0.1%/benzoyl peroxide 2.5% gel in patients with acne vulgaris.

Topical adapalene 0.1%/benzoyl peroxide 2.5% gel was generally well tolerated in patients with acne. In 12-week trials, the most commonly occurring treatment-related adverse events included erythema, scaling, dryness, and stinging/burning; these dermatologic treatment-related adverse events were usually of mild to moderate severity, occurred early in the course of treatment, and resolved without residual effects. Topical adapalene 0.1%/benzoyl peroxide 2.5% gel was generally well tolerated in the longer term, with dry skin being the most commonly occurring treatment-related adverse event over 12 months of treatment.

In conclusion, adapalene 0.1%/benzoyl peroxide 2.5% gel is a valuable agent for the first-line treatment of acne vulgaris.

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© Adis Data Information BV 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Adis, a Wolters Kluwer BusinessAucklandNew Zealand

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