Drugs

, Volume 70, Issue 14, pp 1831–1842

Capsaicin Dermal Patch

In Non-Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathic Pain
Adis Drug Profile

Abstract

Capsaicin dermal patch is an adhesive patch containing a high concentration (8% w/w) of synthetic capsaicin. It is indicated in the EU for the treatment of peripheral neuropathic pain in non-diabetic adults using a single 30- or 60-minute application repeated every 90 days, as required, and in the US for the treatment of neuropathic pain associated with postherpetic neuralgia (PHN).

In pivotal, randomized, double-blind, multicentre trials in adults with PHN, a single 60-minute application of capsaicin dermal patch reduced the mean Numeric Pain Rating Scale (NPRS) scores from baseline to a significantly greater extent than a low-concentration (0.04% w/w capsaicin) control patch during weeks 2–8.

In randomized, double-blind, multicentre trials in patients with HIV-associated neuropathy, capsaicin dermal patch reduced the mean NPRS scores from baseline significantly more than control in one study for the 30- and 90-minute, but not the 60-minute, application during weeks 2–12. In another study, the differences between capsaicin (30- and 60-minute applications) and control did not reach statistical significance. An integrated analysis of both studies showed that the 30-minute application of capsaicin dermal patch was significantly better than control for the reduction from baseline in mean NPRS scores during weeks 2–12.

The efficacy of capsaicin dermal patch was maintained for up to 1 year in extension studies in which patients could receive up to three or four repeat treatments.

Capsaicin dermal patch was generally well tolerated in clinical trials. The most common adverse events were transient, mostly mild to moderate, application-site reactions.

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Copyright information

© Adis Data Information BV 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Adis, a Wolters Kluwer BusinessMairangi Bay, North Shore, AucklandNew Zealand

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