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Drugs

, Volume 70, Issue 8, pp 1059–1078 | Cite as

Panitumumab

A Review of its Use in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer
  • Gillian M. Keating
Adis Drug Evaluation

Abstract

Panitumumab (Vectibix®) is a recombinant, fully human, IgG2 anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) monoclonal antibody. This article reviews the clinical efficacy of intravenous panitumumab in combination with chemotherapy in the first- and second-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer and as monotherapy in chemotherapy-refractory metastatic colorectal cancer, as well as summarizing its pharmacological properties and tolerability. Panitumumab is indicated for use in patients with wild-type rather than mutant KRAS tumours.

The efficacy of intravenous panitumumab 6 mg/kg administered every 2 weeks was examined in randomized, open-label, multicentre, phase III trials in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. When administered as first- or second-line treatment in combination with chemotherapy, panitumumab plus chemotherapy prolonged progression-free survival to a significantly greater extent than chemotherapy alone in patients with wild-type KRAS tumours; no significant between-group difference in overall survival was seen in the second-line treatment trial. In patients with mutant KRAS tumours, progression-free survival was significantly shorter with panitumumab plus oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy than with oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy alone in the first-line treatment trial, with no significant difference between patients receiving panitumumab plus irinotecan-based chemotherapy (FOLFIRI) and those receiving FOLFIRI alone in the second-line treatment trial. In chemotherapy-refractory patients with metastatic colorectal cancer, panitumumab monotherapy plus best supportive care prolonged progression-free survival to a significantly greater extent than best supportive care alone in both the overall population and in patients with wild-type KRAS tumours, but not in those with mutant KRAS tumours; there was no significant between-group difference in overall survival.

Panitumumab has an acceptable tolerability profile when administered as monotherapy or in combination with chemotherapy. It is associated with the skin-related toxicities characteristic of EGFR inhibitors and appears to have a low risk of immunogenicity.

In conclusion, in patients with wild-type KRAS tumours, panitumumab is a useful option in combination with chemotherapy for the first- and second-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer or as monotherapy for the treatment of chemotherapy-refractory metastatic colorectal cancer.

Keywords

Bevacizumab Cetuximab Metastatic Colorectal Cancer National Comprehensive Cancer Network Panitumumab 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Adis Data Information BV 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Adis, a Wolters Kluwer BusinessMairangi Bay, North Shore 0754, AucklandNew Zealand

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