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CNS Drugs

, Volume 24, Issue 4, pp 337–361 | Cite as

OROS® Hydromorphone Prolonged Release

A Review of its Use in the Management of Chronic, Moderate to Severe Pain
  • Natalie J. CarterEmail author
  • Gillian M. Keating
Adis Drug Evaluation

Abstract

OROS® hydromorphone prolonged release (OROS® hydromorphone) [Jurnista™] is a once-daily formulation of the opioid agonist hydromorphone that utilizes OROS® (osmotic-controlled release oral delivery system) technology to deliver the drug at a near constant rate, thereby providing consistent analgesia over a 24-hour period. It is indicated for use in patients with severe pain and contra-indicated in those with acute or post-operative pain.

In several, randomized, multicentre, phase III trials, oral OROS® hydromorphone administered once daily for up to 52 weeks was generally effective in the treatment of patients with chronic, moderate to severe cancer or non-malignant/noncancer pain with regard to improvements from baseline to end-point in patient-assessed measures of pain intensity, pain relief and/or functional impairment. Pharmacoeconomic analyses suggest that OROS® hydromorphone provides greater cost utility than other opioids in this patient population. In addition, OROS® hydromorphone was generally well tolerated in clinical trials, with most adverse events being mild to moderate in severity and similar to those seen with other opioids. Thus, OROS® hydromorphone is an effective and useful alternative to other opioids for the treatment of patients with severe pain.

Keywords

Morphine Oxycodone Hydromorphone Immediate Release Nonmalignant Pain 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgements

The preparation of this review was not supported by any external funding. During the peer review process, the manufacturer of the agent under review was offered an opportunity to comment on this article. Changes resulting from comments received were made on the basis of scientific and editorial merit.

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Adis, a Wolters Kluwer BusinessMairangi Bay, North Shore, AucklandNew Zealand

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