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Beyond the Ego

An Integrative Therapy Experience and the Recovery from Alcoholism

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Abstract

This paper discusses the treatment of a woman recovering from alcoholism using an integrative therapy approach. Understanding the client’s clinical profile from an insight-oriented psychoanalytic perspective and using holistic therapy techniques were the primary tools used during treatment. Breathwork, Phoenix Rising yoga therapy, journaling and letter writing proved to be most beneficial for this client, who experienced post-traumatic stress and conversion disorder.

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Notes

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    Note that this is a brief description of the posture. Therapists should have formal training with Phoenix Rising yoga therapy before implementing this.

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Acknowledgements

I would like to thank Harriet for sharing her story and allowing me to ride the wave of healing with her. I would also like to thank Michael Lee for following his insight and intuition to develop Phoenix Rising yoga therapy offering both clients and therapists a chance to heal in the treatment dance.

The author has provided no information regarding conflicts of interest directly relevant to the content of this study.

Author information

Correspondence to Dr Maria Napoli.

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Napoli, M. Beyond the Ego. Evid-Based-Integrative-Med 1, 209–216 (2004). https://doi.org/10.2165/01197065-200401030-00009

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Keywords

  • Migraine
  • Conversion Disorder
  • Mental Causation
  • Letter Writing
  • Yoga Practise