CNS Drugs

, Volume 15, Issue 4, pp 329–337 | Cite as

Perospirone

Adis New Drug Profile

Abstract

▴ Perospirone is an atypical antipsychotic agent for the treatment of schizophrenia. Its primary mode of action is through antagonism of serotonin 5-HT2A and dopamine D2 receptors.

▴ An 8-week course of oral perospirone 8 to 48 mg/day displayed efficacy in up to 75% of patients with schizophrenia participating in phase II and phase III trials. The onset of action of the drug was about 2 weeks.

▴ Perospirone was effective against positive, negative and general symptoms in patients with schizophrenia, as assessed with standard rating scales (Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale, Positive and Negative Symptom Scale).

▴ Compared with haloperidol 2 to 12 mg/day, perospirone 8 to 48 mg/day was significantly more effective against negative symptoms and tended to be more effective against general symptoms and most positive symptoms in a trial in 145 patients with schizophrenia. Perospirone had efficacy similar to that of mosapramine 50 to 300 mg/day in a comparative phase III trial in 159 patients.

▴ Extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS) tended to occur less often and were generally milder with perospirone than with haloperidol or mosapramine.

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Copyright information

© Adis International Limited 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Adis International LimitedMairangi Bay, Auckland 10New Zealand

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