Sports Medicine

, Volume 32, Issue 5, pp 285–296

Anabolic Steroids

A Review for the Clinician
  • Eric C. Kutscher
  • Brian C. Lund
  • Paul J. Perry
Leading Article

Abstract

The number of athletes self-administering ergogenic pharmacological agents to increase their competitive edge continues to be a problem. Most athletes using anabolic steroids (AS) have acquired a crude pharmacological database regarding these drugs. Their opinions regarding steroids have been derived from their subjective experiences and anecdotal information. For this reason, traditional warnings regarding the lack of efficacy and potential dangers of steroid misuse are disregarded. A common widely held opinion among bodybuilders is that the anabolic steroid experts are the athletic gurus who for years have utilised themselves as the experimental participants and then dispensed their empirical findings. This review will address the common anabolic steroid misconceptions held by many of today’s athletes by providing an evaluation of the scientific literature related to AS in athletic performance.

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Copyright information

© Adis International Limited 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eric C. Kutscher
    • 1
    • 2
  • Brian C. Lund
    • 2
  • Paul J. Perry
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Western Missouri Mental Health CenterKansas CityUSA
  2. 2.Clinical and Administrative Pharmacy Division, College of PharmacyUniversity of IowaIowa CityUSA
  3. 3.Department of Psychiatry, College of MedicineUniversity of IowaIowa CityUSA

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