Drugs

, Volume 53, Issue 1, pp 40–73 | Cite as

Drug Treatment of HIV-Related Opportunistic Infections

Disease Management

Summary

The AIDS epidemic has led to the emergence of several disease entities which in the pre-AIDS era were rare or seemingly innocuous. Experience of treating these diseases varies. In some instances, such as Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, there is an abundance of published literature to direct our course of action. However, for many of these newly recognised diseases our treatment experience is limited. Furthermore, in many instances, well controlled trials evaluating treatment modalities in the AIDS population are lacking. We have identified 13 disease entities (P carinii pneumonia, toxoplasmosis, cryptococcosis, histoplasmosis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium avium complex, cytomegalovirus, coccidioidomycosis, isosporiasis, candidosis, Kaposi’s sarcoma, herpes simplex virus, and varicella zoster virus) and have reviewed the current literature with regard to their treatment.

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© Adis International Limited 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Division of Clinical and Administrative Pharmacy, College of PharmacyUniversity of IowaIowa CityUSA

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