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Drugs

, Volume 36, Issue 3, pp 370–381 | Cite as

The Optimum Management of Arthropathies

  • C. S. Wolfe
  • G. R. V. Hughes
Practical Therapeutics

Summary

The aims in management of an arthropathy are to relieve symptoms, preserve function, and control the disease process. Drugs are an important, although not the only, part of any therapeutic regimen enabling us to achieve these aims.

Although each individual requires a unique strategy, there is a logical progression from first-line agents to second-line agents. Third-line agents and experimental methods are reserved for aggressive or life-threatening disease. The choice of agent in each group is personal preference, but many agents have high adverse effect profiles, and close moni-toring is essential.

Keywords

Rheumatoid Arthritis Rheumatic Disease Arthropathy Septic Arthritis Levamisole 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© ADIS Press Limited 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. S. Wolfe
    • 1
  • G. R. V. Hughes
    • 1
  1. 1.Lupus Research LaboratorySt Thomas’ HospitalLondonEngland

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