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Clinical Pharmacokinetics

, Volume 23, Issue 6, pp 469–476 | Cite as

Pharmacokinetic Study of Omeprazole in Elderly Healthy Volunteers

  • Sten Landahl
  • Tommy Andersson
  • Mayethel Larsson
  • Bodil Lernfeldt
  • Per Lundborg
  • Carl-Gunnar Regårdh
  • Eva Sixt
  • Inger Skånberg
Original Research Article

Summary

The pharmacokinetics of omeprazole and its metabolites were studied in 8 healthy elderly volunteers using [14C]omeprazole. In another 6 healthy elderly volunteers, the pharmacokinetics of omeprazole were studied using unlabelled drug. Each volunteer received single doses of omeprazole intravenously (20mg) and orally (40mg) as solutions in a randomised crossover design. The plasma concentrations and urinary excretion of omeprazole and metabolites were followed for 24 and 96h, respectively.

The results indicate that the average metabolic capacity of omeprazole is decreased in the elderly compared with that found in earlier studies of healthy young individuals. This was reflected in an increase in bioavailability from 56 to 76%, a reduction in mean systemic clearance by approximately 50% (0.25 L/min) and a prolongation of the mean elimination half-life from 0.7 to 1.0h compared with the young.

Despite these findings, the considerable overlap in these parameters between young and old volunteers, together with data from previous pharmacodynamic studies and the wide therapeutic range of omeprazole, indicate that dosage reductions are not needed in the elderly.

Keywords

Omeprazole Liver Blood Flow Young Volunteer Healthy Young Volunteer Healthy Elderly Volunteer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Adis International Limited 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sten Landahl
    • 1
    • 2
  • Tommy Andersson
    • 1
    • 2
  • Mayethel Larsson
    • 1
    • 2
  • Bodil Lernfeldt
    • 1
    • 2
  • Per Lundborg
    • 1
    • 2
  • Carl-Gunnar Regårdh
    • 1
    • 2
  • Eva Sixt
    • 1
    • 2
  • Inger Skånberg
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Geriatric and Longterm Care Medicine, Clinic IVVasa HospitalGöteborgSweden
  2. 2.Astra Hässle ABMölndalSweden

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