Drugs & Aging

, Volume 19, Issue 10, pp 723–732

Does the Angiotensin II Receptor Antagonist Losartan Improve Cognitive Function?

  • Michele A. Tedesco
  • Gennaro Ratti
  • Giovanni Di Salvo
  • Francesco Natale
Current Opinion

DOI: 10.2165/00002512-200219100-00001

Cite this article as:
Tedesco, M.A., Ratti, G., Di Salvo, G. et al. Drugs Aging (2002) 19: 723. doi:10.2165/00002512-200219100-00001

Abstract

Newer classes of antihypertensive agents, such as angiotensin II receptor antagonists, may offer benefits to patients in addition to their ability to lower blood pressure. It is accepted that chronic hypertension contributes to the development of cerebrovascular and cardiovascular disease, and several studies have demonstrated a link between hypertension and reduced cognitive function, especially in patients not receiving antihypertensive medication. In an initial clinical trial, the angiotensin II receptor antagonist losartan was shown to improve cognitive function in patients with hypertension, including in those who were elderly (up to 73 years of age). This effect cannot be explained by a reduction in blood pressure alone and is likely to involve interactions with the diverse biological actions of the renin-angiotensin system.

Improving or maintaining cognitive function in patients with hypertension may translate into economic benefits beyond those expected due to blood pressure control, and would result in considerable quality-of-life benefits for the aging population.

Copyright information

© Adis International Limited 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michele A. Tedesco
    • 1
  • Gennaro Ratti
    • 1
  • Giovanni Di Salvo
    • 1
  • Francesco Natale
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Cardio-Thoracic and Respiratory SciencesSecond University of NaplesNaplesItaly
  2. 2.NaplesItaly

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