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Drugs & Aging

, Volume 15, Issue 2, pp 81–89 | Cite as

Late-Onset Schizophrenia

Epidemiology, Diagnosis, Management and Outcomes
  • Peter A. Wynn Owen
  • David J. CastleEmail author
Disease Management

Abstract

The onset of schizophrenia for the first time in late life has been considered rare, and the nosology of the late-onset functional psychoses remains contentious. However, it is clear that a significant proportion of individuals with a diagnosis of schizophrenia do have the first onset of the illness in late and very late life. The clinical presentation of such patients shows some differences from patients with early-onset disease, particularly in having a lower prevalence of premorbid dysfunction, negative symptoms and formal thought disorder. The longitudinal course is variable, possibly a reflection of aetiological heterogeneity. Atypical antipsychotic agents would appear to have significant benefits in the treatment of this group of patients, given the particular vulnerability of the elderly to extrapyramidal adverse effects, notably tardive dyskinesia.

Keywords

Schizophrenia Adis International Limited Clozapine Psychotic Symptom Tardive Dyskinesia 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Adis International Limited 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Directorate of Mental Health ServicesFremantle Hospital and Health Service, Alma Street CentreFremantleAustralia

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