Drug Safety

, Volume 28, Issue 11, pp 981–1007

Perspectives on the Use of Data Mining in Pharmacovigilance

  • June Almenoff
  • Joseph M. Tonning
  • A. Lawrence Gould
  • Ana Szarfman
  • Manfred Hauben
  • Rita Ouellet-Hellstrom
  • Robert Ball
  • Ken Hornbuckle
  • Louisa Walsh
  • Chuen Yee
  • Susan T. Sacks
  • Nancy Yuen
  • Vaishali Patadia
  • Michael Blum
  • Mike Johnston
  • Charles Gerrits
  • Harry Seifert
  • Karol LaCroix
Leading Article

DOI: 10.2165/00002018-200528110-00002

Cite this article as:
Almenoff, J., Tonning, J.M., Gould, A.L. et al. Drug-Safety (2005) 28: 981. doi:10.2165/00002018-200528110-00002

Abstract

In the last 5 years, regulatory agencies and drug monitoring centres have been developing computerised data-mining methods to better identify reporting relationships in spontaneous reporting databases that could signal possible adverse drug reactions. At present, there are no guidelines or standards for the use of these methods in routine pharmacovigilance. In 2003, a group of statisticians, pharmacoepidemiologists and pharmacovigilance professionals from the pharmaceutical industry and the US FDA formed the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America-FDA Collaborative Working Group on Safety Evaluation Tools to review best practices for the use of these methods.

In this paper, we provide an overview of: (i) the statistical and operational attributes of several currently used methods and their strengths and limitations; (ii) information about the characteristics of various postmarketing safety databases with which these tools can be deployed; (iii) analytical considerations for using safety data-mining methods and interpreting the results; and (iv) points to consider in integration of safety data mining with traditional pharmacovigilance methods. Perspectives from both the FDA and the industry are provided.

Data mining is a potentially useful adjunct to traditional pharmacovigilance methods. The results of data mining should be viewed as hypothesis generating and should be evaluated in the context of other relevant data. The availability of a publicly accessible global safety database, which is updated on a frequent basis, would further enhance detection and communication about safety issues.

Copyright information

© Adis Data Information BV. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • June Almenoff
    • 1
  • Joseph M. Tonning
    • 2
  • A. Lawrence Gould
    • 3
  • Ana Szarfman
    • 2
  • Manfred Hauben
    • 4
    • 5
    • 6
  • Rita Ouellet-Hellstrom
    • 2
  • Robert Ball
    • 2
  • Ken Hornbuckle
    • 7
  • Louisa Walsh
    • 8
  • Chuen Yee
    • 9
  • Susan T. Sacks
    • 10
  • Nancy Yuen
    • 1
  • Vaishali Patadia
    • 11
  • Michael Blum
    • 12
  • Mike Johnston
    • 2
  • Charles Gerrits
    • 13
  • Harry Seifert
    • 1
  • Karol LaCroix
    • 1
  1. 1.Global Clinical Safety and PharmacovigilanceGlaxoSmithKlineResearch Triangle ParkUSA
  2. 2.US Food & Drug AdministrationRockvilleUSA
  3. 3.Merck Research LaboratoriesWest PointUSA
  4. 4.Pfizer Inc.New YorkUSA
  5. 5.Department of MedicineNYU School of MedicineNew YorkUSA
  6. 6.Departments of Pharmacology and Community and Preventive MedicineNew York Medical CollegeValhallaUSA
  7. 7.Eli Lilly and CompanyIndianapolisUSA
  8. 8.AstraZeneca LPWilmingtonUSA
  9. 9.Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research & Development L.L.C.TitusvilleUSA
  10. 10.Hoffmann-La Roche Inc.NutleyUSA
  11. 11.Allergan Inc.IrvineUSA
  12. 12.Wyeth ResearchCollegevilleUSA
  13. 13.Schering-Plough Research InstituteSpringfieldUSA

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