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Drug Safety

, Volume 9, Issue 4, pp 309–311 | Cite as

Possible Interaction between Phenobarbital, Carbamazepine and Itraconazole

  • Marcel Bonay
  • Annie Pierre Jonville-Bera
  • Patrice Diot
  • Etienne Lemarie
  • Michel Lavandier
  • Elisabeth Autret
Case Report Drug Experience

Summary

We report a case of a possible interaction between itraconazole, phenobarbital and carbamazepine. The first plasma itraconazole concentration, measured when the patient had been taking phenobarbital for 2 months, was very low. The second measurement, 2 months after withdrawing phenobarbital, was higher but below the therapeutic range. However, carbamazepine, a well known enzyme inducer, had been initiated 15 days before. 20 days after carbamazepine was withdrawn, the itraconazole concentration 4 hours after administration was near the lower end of the therapeutic range. The mechanism of this possible interaction is probably the same for phenobarbital and carbamazepine, involving hepatic microsomal enzyme system induction.

Keywords

Carbamazepine Valproic Acid Itraconazole Phenobarbital Therapeutic Range 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Adis International Limited 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marcel Bonay
    • 1
  • Annie Pierre Jonville-Bera
    • 1
  • Patrice Diot
    • 1
  • Etienne Lemarie
    • 1
  • Michel Lavandier
    • 1
  • Elisabeth Autret
    • 1
  1. 1.Service de Pneumologie and Centre de PharmacovigilanceCHU BretonneauToursFrance

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