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Drug Safety

, Volume 7, Issue 4, pp 268–281 | Cite as

Drug Interactions with Quinolone Antibacterials

  • Jacobus R. B. J. Brouwers
Review Article Drug Experience

Summary

The quinolone antibacterials are prone to many interactions with other drugs. Quinolone absorption is markedly reduced with antacids containing aluminium, magnesium and/or calcium and therapeutic failure may result.

Other metallic ion-containing drugs, such as sucralfate, iron salts, and zinc salts, can also reduce absorption.

Some of the newer quinolones inhibit the cytochrome P450 system, e.g. enoxacin, pefloxacin and ciprofloxacin. The toxicity of drugs that are metabolised by the cytochrome P450 system is enhanced by concomitant use of some quinolones. Ciprofloxacin, enoxacin and pefloxacin can increase theophylline concentrations to toxic values. The pharmacokinetics of warfarin and cyclosporin are unaffected. Ofloxacin, fleroxacin and temafloxacin have a low inhibitory effect on the cytochrome P450 system and a low interaction potential may result.

The affinity of quinolones for the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor may induce CNS adverse effects; these effects are enhanced by some nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).

Keywords

Theophylline Ofloxacin Norfloxacin Sucralfate Pefloxacin 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Adis International Limited 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jacobus R. B. J. Brouwers
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Pharmacy and PharmacokineticsTjongerschans General HospitalHeerenveenThe Netherlands
  2. 2.University Center for Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacology and TherapeuticsState UniversityGroningenThe Netherlands

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