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Canadian Journal of Public Health

, Volume 110, Issue 2, pp 253–255 | Cite as

A call for integrated foot care and amputation prevention pathways for patients with diabetes and peripheral arterial disease across Canada

  • Mohamad A. Hussain
  • Mohammed Al-Omran
  • Konrad Salata
  • Atul Sivaswamy
  • Subodh Verma
  • Thomas L. Forbes
  • Ahmed Kayssi
  • Charles de MestralEmail author
Letter to the Editor

Dear Editor,

Leg amputation is a devastating complication of diabetes and peripheral arterial disease (PAD). While most diabetic and many PAD-related amputations are preventable, foot care and amputation prevention efforts remain shockingly disjointed in Canada. Primary prevention efforts are often not supported by clear referral networks when foot wounds, gangrene, or infection arise. Acute care of these complications may also lack the required multidisciplinary input from a range of experts: foot specialists (chiropody/podiatry), wound care nursing, surgeons, physicians, occupational and physical therapists, social workers, and pharmacists. Furthermore, multi-morbidity and social marginalization can hinder compliance with treatment recommendations and sustained secondary prevention.

Evidence-based guidelines exist to inform best practice around screening and the key pillars of evaluation and treatment—wound care, pressure offloading, treatment of infection, assessment, and treatment...

Notes

Acknowledgements

This analysis was supported by the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES), which is funded by an annual grant from the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care (MOHLTC). The opinions, results and conclusions reported in this paper are those of the authors and are independent from the funding sources. No endorsement by ICES or the Ontario MOHLTC is intended or should be inferred. Parts of this material are based on data and information compiled and provided by the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI). The opinions, results and conclusions reported in this paper are those of the authors and are independent from the funding sources and CIHI.

This article reports the quantitative part of a mixed methods research project conducted for a doctoral dissertation during winter 2018 at the University of Ottawa.

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Copyright information

© The Canadian Public Health Association 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mohamad A. Hussain
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Mohammed Al-Omran
    • 1
    • 3
    • 4
    • 5
  • Konrad Salata
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Atul Sivaswamy
    • 2
  • Subodh Verma
    • 1
    • 3
    • 5
  • Thomas L. Forbes
    • 1
    • 3
    • 5
    • 6
  • Ahmed Kayssi
    • 3
    • 5
    • 6
    • 7
  • Charles de Mestral
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 5
    Email author
  1. 1.Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute of St. Michaels HospitalTorontoCanada
  2. 2.ICESTorontoCanada
  3. 3.Department of SurgeryUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada
  4. 4.Department of SurgeryKing Saud UniversityRiyadhKingdom of Saudi Arabia
  5. 5.Diabetes Action Canada Working Group on Foot Care and Amputation PreventionTorontoCanada
  6. 6.Peter Munk Cardiac CentreUniversity Health NetworkTorontoCanada
  7. 7.Sunnybrook Research Institute of Sunnybrook Health Sciences CentreTorontoCanada

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