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European Journal of Dermatology

, Volume 27, Issue 3, pp 266–270 | Cite as

Cutaneous adverse effects during ipilimumab treatment for metastatic melanoma: a prospective study

  • Emi Dika
  • Giulia Maria RavaioliEmail author
  • Pier Alessandro Fanti
  • Bianca Maria Piraccini
  • Martina Lambertini
  • Marco Adriano Chessa
  • Carlotta Baraldi
  • Simone Ribero
  • Ardizzoni Andrea
  • Barbara Melotti
  • Annalisa Patrizi
Clinical report

Abstract

Background

Ipilimumab is an immunomodulatory antibody directed against cytotoxicT-lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4), which is administered to patients with advanced melanoma, with a proven positive effect on overall survival. The cutaneous adverse effects (AEs) of ipilimumab are relatively frequent, although described as usually mild and rarely life threatening.

Objectives

To describe a three-year experience of a single institute in detecting and managing cutaneous AEs.

Materials & Methods

A cohort of patients (n = 41) treated with ipilimumab (3 mg/kg/three weeks) for metastatic melanoma, from 2013 to 2016,was investigated for adverse cutaneous events.

Results

On dermatological evaluation, 34.1% of the patients in our series developed cutaneous AEs: rash (7.3%; n = 3), folliculitis (7.3%; n = 3), mucositis (2.4%; n = 1), rosacea (2.4%; n = 1), eczema (2.4%; n = 1), acneiform eruption (2.4%; n = 1), syringometaplasia mucinosa (2.4%; n = 1), Stevens-Johnson syndrome (2.4%; n = 1), and vitiligo (4.9%; n = 2). These were all Grade 1 and 2 AEs, except for the case of Stevens-Johnson syndrome (Grade 4). On a patient-reported scale, 4.9% (n = 2) and 9.8% (n = 4) of the patients complained of severe xerosis and pruritus, respectively.

Conclusion

Ipilimumab was relatively well tolerated in our series, mainly causing mild cutaneous AEs, which, in our experience, responded satisfactorily to conventional therapies. Only in one case was the treatment discontinued, due to Grade 4 side effects.

Key words

ipilimumab adverse events melanoma treatment 

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Copyright information

© John Libbey Eurotext 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Emi Dika
    • 1
  • Giulia Maria Ravaioli
    • 1
    Email author
  • Pier Alessandro Fanti
    • 1
  • Bianca Maria Piraccini
    • 1
  • Martina Lambertini
    • 1
  • Marco Adriano Chessa
    • 1
  • Carlotta Baraldi
    • 1
  • Simone Ribero
    • 2
  • Ardizzoni Andrea
    • 3
  • Barbara Melotti
    • 3
  • Annalisa Patrizi
    • 1
  1. 1.Dermatology, Department of Experimental, Diagnostic and Specialty MedicineUniversity of BolognaBolognaItaly
  2. 2.Department of Medical Sciences, Section of DermatologyUniversity of TurinTurinItaly
  3. 3.Oncology Medical Unit; Department of Oncology and HaematologyUniversity of BolognaBolognaItaly

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