Wetlands

, Volume 28, Issue 2, pp 390–400 | Cite as

Macroinvertebrate assemblages in blackwater streams draining forest land and active and abandoned cranberry bogs

  • Robert A. Zampella
  • John F. Bunnell
  • Nicholas A. Procopio
  • Dean E. Bryson
Article

Abstract

Cranberry agriculture is a major land use in parts of the New Jersey Pinelands, USA. We compared the composition of genus-level macroinvertebrate assemblages collected from three habitats (muck, vegetated muck, and woody debris) in 12 New Jersey Pinelands blackwater streams draining forest, abandoned-cranberry bogs, and active-cranberry bogs and evaluated whether variations in macroinvertebrate assemblages were related to differences in land uses within the associated drainage basins. All 12 streams were relatively slow moving and acidic, with low conductance values and dissolved-oxygen concentrations. Muck was the dominant substrate at most stream sites. Many of the taxa that we encountered are adapted to lentic habitats, slow-moving lotic habitats, or low-oxygen environments. Macroinvertebrate composition differed significantly between the active-cranberry streams and the other two stream types and was associated with a complex environmental gradient represented by variations in dissolved oxygen, temperature, specific conductance, stream width, and woody debris. Overall, the effect of stream type appeared to overshadow that of the three different habitats. Although we cannot conclude that subtle between-site differences in dissolved oxygen were responsible for variations in community composition, many of the genera associated with the forest and abandoned-bog/active-cranberry ends of the community gradient are reported to have contrasting tolerances to low-oxygen levels. The relationship between reduced canopy cover and both lower woody-debris cover and higher stream temperatures, which can influence dissolved-oxygen levels, was most likely related to forest-canopy removal associated with historic- and active-cranberry agriculture.

Key Words

cranberry agriculture historic land uses New Jersey Pinelands wetland agriculture 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Literature Cited

  1. Anderson, J. R., E. E. Hardy, J. T. Roach, and R. E. Witmer. 1976. A land use and land cover classification system for use with remote sensor data. U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 964.Google Scholar
  2. Anderson, P. and D. Davis. 2000. Evaluation of efforts to reduce pesticide contamination in cranberry bog drainage. Publication No. 00-03-041. Department of Ecological Publications, Washington State Department of Ecology, Olympia, WA, USA.Google Scholar
  3. Barbour, M. T., J. Gerritsen, B. D. Snyder, and J. B. Stribling. 1999. Rapid bioassessment protocols for use in streams and wadeable rivers: periphyton, benthic macroinvertebrates and fish, second edition. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water, Washington, DC, USA. EPA 841-B-99-002.Google Scholar
  4. Burcher, C. L. and L. A. Smock. 2002. Habitat distribution, dietary composition and life history characteristics of odonate nymphs in a blackwater Coastal Plain stream. The American Midland Naturalist 148: 75–89.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Collier, K. J., O. J. Ball, A. K. Graesser, M. R. Main, and M. J. Winterbourn. 1990. Do organic and anthropogenic acidity have similar effects on aquatic fauna? Oikos 59: 33–38.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Courtney, L. A. and W. H. Clements. 1998. Effects of acidic pH on benthic macroinvertebrate communities in stream microcosms. Hydrobiologia 379: 135–45.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Delong, M. D. and M. A. Brusven. 1998. Macroinvertebrate community structure along the longitudinal gradient of an agriculturally impacted stream. Environmental Management 22: 445–57.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. DeLuca, M. J., H. L. Hoppe, H. A. Doyle, and B. J. Gray. 2002. Water resources data, New Jersey, water year 2001, volume 3. Water-quality data. U.S. Geological Survey water-data report NJ-01-3. U.S. Geological Survey, West Trenton, NJ, USA.Google Scholar
  9. DeLuca, M. J., H. L. Hoppe, H. A. Heckathorn, B. J. Gray, and M. L. Riskin. 2003. Water resources data, New Jersey, water year 2002, volume 3. Water-quality data. tU.S. Geological Survey water-data report NJ-02-3. U.S. Geological Survey, West Trenton, NJ, USA.Google Scholar
  10. Dougherty, J. E. and M. D. Morgan. 1991. Benthic community response (primarily Chironomidae) to nutrient enrichment and alkalinization in shallow, soft water humic lakes. Hydrobiologia 215: 73–82.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Dufrêne, M. and P. Legendre. 1997. Species assemblages and indicator species: the need for a flexible asymmetrical approach. Ecological Monographs 67: 345–66.Google Scholar
  12. Eck, P. 1990. The American Cranberry. Rutgers University Press, New Brunswick, NJ, USA.Google Scholar
  13. Edmunds, G. F., Jr. and R. D. Waltz. 1996. Ephemeroptera. p. 126–63. In R. W. Merritt and K. W. Cummins (eds.) An Introduction to the Aquatic Insects of North America, third edition. Kendall/Hunt Publishing Company, Dubuque, IA, USA.Google Scholar
  14. Foster, D., F. Swanson, J. Aber, I. Burke, N. Brokaw, D. Tilman, and A. Knapp. 2003. The importance of land-use legacies to ecology and conservation. BioScience 53: 77–88.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Harding, J. S., E. F. Benfield, P. V. Bolstad, G. S. Helfman, and E. B. D. Jones, III. 1998. Stream biodiversity: the ghost of land use past. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 95: 14843–47.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  16. Hastings, R. W. 1979. Fish of the Pine Barrens. p. 489–504. In R. T. T. Forman (ed.) Pine Barrens: Ecosystem and Landscape. Academic Press, New York, NY, USA.Google Scholar
  17. Hastings, R. W. 1984. The fishes of the Mullica River, a naturally acid water system of the New Jersey Pine Barrens. Bulletin of the New Jersey Academy of Science 29: 9–23.Google Scholar
  18. Hill, M. O. 1979a. DECORANA-A FORTRAN Program for Detrended Correspondence Analysis and Reciprocal Averaging. Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA.Google Scholar
  19. Hill, M. O. 1979b. TWINSPAN-A FORTRAN Program for Arranging Multivariate Data in an Ordered Two-way Table by Classification of Individuals and Attributes. Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA.Google Scholar
  20. Hill, M. O. and H. G. Gauch, Jr. 1980. Detrended correspondence analysis: an improved ordination technique. Vegetatio 42: 47–58.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Hilsenhoff, W. L. 1987. An improved biotic index of organic stream pollution. The Great Lakes Entomologist 20: 31–39.Google Scholar
  22. Hilsenhoff, W. L. 1988. Rapid field assessment of organic pollution with a family-level biotic index. Journal of the North American Benthological Society 7: 65–68.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Hilsenhoff, W. L. 2001. Diversity and classification of insects and Collembola. p. 661–731. In J. H. Thorp and A. P. Covich (eds.) Ecology and Classification of North American Freshwater Invertebrates, second edition. Academic Press, San Diego, CA, USA.Google Scholar
  24. Jones, R. C. and C. C. Clark. 1987. Impact of watershed urbanization on stream insect communities. Water Resources Bulletin 23: 1047–55.Google Scholar
  25. Kennen, J. G. 1999. Relation of macroinvertebrate community impairment to catchment characteristics in New Jersey streams. Journal of the American Water Resources Association 35: 939–55.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. LaRow, E. J. 1970. The effect of oxygen tension on the vertical migration of Chaoborus larvae. Limnology and Oceanography 15: 357–62.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Lenat, D. R. and J. K. Crawford. 1994. Effects of land use on water quality and aquatic biota of three North Carolina Piedmont streams. Hydrobiologia 294: 185–99.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Mast, M. A. and J. T. Turk. 1999. Environmental characteristics and water quality of hydrologic benchmark network stations in the eastern United States, 1963–95. U.S. Geological Survey Circular 1173-A.Google Scholar
  29. McCune, B. and J. B. Grace. 2002. Analysis of Ecological Communities. MjM Software Design, Gleneden Beach, OR, USA.Google Scholar
  30. McCune, B. and M. J. Mefford. 1999. PC-ORD. Multivariate Analysis of Ecological Data, Version 4. MjM Software Design, Gleneden Beach, OR, USA.Google Scholar
  31. Morgan, M. D. and K. R. Philipp. 1986. The effect of agricultural and residential development on aquatic macrophytes in the New Jersey Pine Barrens. Biological Conservation 35: 143–58.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Patrick, R. 1996. Rivers of the United States, Volume 3: The Eastern and Southeastern States. John Wiley and Sons, Inc., New York, NY, USA.Google Scholar
  33. Petrin, Z., H. Laudon, and B. Malmqvist. 2007. Does freshwater macroinvertebrate diversity along a pH-gradient reflect adaptation to low pH? Freshwater Biology 52: 2172–83.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. Procopio, N. A. 2006. An evaluation of landscapes, hydrology, and channel morphology of coastal plain drainages with different cranberry agriculture histories. Ph.D. Dissertation. Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, USA.Google Scholar
  35. Rice, W. R. 1989. Analyzing tables of statistical tests. Evolution 43: 223–25.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. Rice, W. R. 1990. A consensus combined p-value test and family wide significance of component tests. Biometrics 46: 303–08.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  37. Siegel, S. and N. J. Castellan. 1988. Nonparametric Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences, second edition. McGraw-Hill, New York, NY, USA.Google Scholar
  38. Smith, L. C. and L. A. Smock. 1992. Ecology of invertebrate predators in a Coastal Plain stream. Freshwater Biology 28: 319–29.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  39. Sobiech, S. A. and M. G. Henry. 2003. The difficulty of determining the effects of pesticides on aquatic communities. p. 125–34. In T. P. Simon (ed.) Biological Response Signatures: Indicator Patterns Using Aquatic Communities. CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL, USA.Google Scholar
  40. Sponseller, R. A., E. F. Benfield, and H. M. Valett. 2001. Relationships between land use, spatial scale and stream macroinvertebrate communities. Freshwater Biology 52: 1409–24.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  41. Stepenuck, K. F., R. L. Crunkilton, and L. Wang. 2002. Impacts of urban land use on macroinvertebrate communities in southeastern Wisconsin streams. Journal of the American Water Resources Association 38: 1041–51.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  42. Stewart, P. M., J. T. Butcher, and T. P. Simon. 2003. Fish and benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages as indicators of stream degradation in urbanizing watersheds. p. 227–49. In T. P. Simon (ed.) Biological Response Signatures: Indicator Patterns Using Aquatic Communities. CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL, USA.Google Scholar
  43. Stewart, K. W. and P. P. Harper. 1996. Plecoptera. p. 217–66. In R. W. Merritt and K. W. Cummins (eds.) An Introduction to the Aquatic Insects of North America, third edition. Kendall/ Hunt Publishing Company, Dubuque, IA, USA.Google Scholar
  44. Szeto, S. Y., M. T. Wan, P. Price, and J. Roland. 1990. Distribution and persistence of diazinon in a cranberry bog. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry 38: 281–85.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  45. U.S. Department of Agriculture. 2003. 2002 Cranberry statistics. New Jersey Agricultural Statistics Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Trenton, NJ, USA.Google Scholar
  46. Westfall, M. J., Jr. and K. J. Tennessen. 1996. Odonata. p. 164–211. In R. W. Merritt and K. W. Cummins (eds.) An Introduction to the Aquatic Insects of North America, third edition. Kendall/Hunt Publishing Company, Dubuque, IA, USA.Google Scholar
  47. Wiggins, G. B. 1996a. Larvae of the North American Caddisfly Genera (Trichoptera), second edition. University of Toronto Press, Toronto, Canada.Google Scholar
  48. Wiggins, G. B. 1996b. Trichopteran families. p. 309–49. In R. W. Merritt and K. W. Cummins (eds.) An Introduction to the Aquatic Insects of North America, third edition. Kendall/Hunt Publishing Company, Dubuque, IA, USA.Google Scholar
  49. Wright, A. B. and L. A. Smock. 2001. Macroinvertebrate community structure and production in a low-gradient stream in an undisturbed watershed. Archiv für Hydrobiologie 152: 297–313.Google Scholar
  50. Zampella, R. A. and J. F. Bunnell. 1998. Use of reference-site fish assemblages to assess aquatic degradation in Pinelands streams. Ecological Applications 8: 645–58.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  51. Zampella, R. A. and J. F. Bunnell. 2000. The distribution of anurans in two river systems of a Coastal Plain watershed. Journal of Herpetology 34: 210–21.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  52. Zampella, R. A., J. F. Bunnell, K. J. Laidig, and C. L. Dow. 2001. The Mullica River Basin: a report to the Pinelands Commission on the status of the landscape and selected aquatic and wetland resources. Pinelands Commission, New Lisbon, NJ, USA.Google Scholar
  53. Zampella, R. A., J. F. Bunnell, K. J. Laidig, and N. A. Procopio. 2003. The Rancocas Creek Basin: a report to the Pinelands Commission on the status of selected aquatic and wetland resources. Pinelands Commission, New Lisbon, NJ, USA.Google Scholar
  54. Zampella, R. A. and K. J. Laidig. 1997. Effect of watershed disturbance on Pinelands stream vegetation. Journal of the Torrey Botanical Society 124: 52–66.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  55. Zampella, R. A., N. A. Procopio, R. G. Lathrop, and C. L. Dow. 2007. Relationship of land-use/land-cover patterns and surface-water quality in the Mullica River Basin. Journal of the American Water Resources Association 43: 594–604.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© The Society of Wetland Scientists 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert A. Zampella
    • 1
  • John F. Bunnell
    • 1
  • Nicholas A. Procopio
    • 1
  • Dean E. Bryson
    • 2
  1. 1.Pinelands CommissionNew LisbonUSA
  2. 2.New Jersey Department of Environmental ProtectionBureau of Freshwater and Biological MonitoringTrentonUSA

Personalised recommendations