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Economic Botany

, Volume 58, Issue 4, pp 647–667 | Cite as

Wild vegetable resources and market survey in Xishuangbanna, Southwest China

  • Xu You-kai
  • Tao Guo-Da
  • Liu Hong-Mao
  • Yan Kang-La
  • Dao Xiang-Sheng
Article

Abstract

The article presents results of a field and market survey on characteristics and use of wild vegetable consumption for local ethnic groups in Xishuangbanna, SW China. A total of 284 wild vascular plant species and varieties were identified as wild vegetables consumed by three distinct native ethnic groups. These wild vegetables account for 6.1% of total vascular plant species in this area. Wild vegetables play an important role in the ethnic groups’ diet and source of cash income. Based on a 10-month market survey, wild vegetables accounted for 20.6% (in weight) of total vegetable sales. The structure of income from total vegetable sales varied among ethnic groups, with high sales for those living close to dense forests. The use of wild-vegetable resources can increase income of local ethnic groups, thus contributing to the conservation of forest resources in the region.

Key words

Wild vegetable plant resources ethnobotany market survey Xishuangbanna 

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Copyright information

© The New York Botanical Garden Press 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Xu You-kai
    • 1
  • Tao Guo-Da
    • 1
  • Liu Hong-Mao
    • 1
  • Yan Kang-La
    • 1
  • Dao Xiang-Sheng
    • 1
  1. 1.Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Gardenthe Chinese Academy of SciencesMengla County, Yunnan Provincethe People’s Republic of China

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