Journal of Zhejiang University SCIENCE C

, Volume 13, Issue 12, pp 875–880 | Cite as

Societally connected multimedia across cultures

  • Zhongfei Zhang
  • Zhengyou Zhang
  • Ramesh Jain
  • Yueting Zhuang
  • Noshir Contractor
  • Alexander G. Hauptmann
  • Alejandro Alex Jaimes
  • Wanqing Li
  • Alexander C. Loui
  • Tao Mei
  • Nicu Sebe
  • Yonghong Tian
  • Vincent S. Tseng
  • Qing Wang
  • Changsheng Xu
  • Huimin Yu
  • Shiwen Yu
Perspective
  • 175 Downloads

Abstract

The advance of the Internet in the past decade has radically changed the way people communicate and collaborate with each other. Physical distance is no more a barrier in online social networks, but cultural differences (at the individual, community, as well as societal levels) still govern human-human interactions and must be considered and leveraged in the online world. The rapid deployment of high-speed Internet allows humans to interact using a rich set of multimedia data such as texts, pictures, and videos. This position paper proposes to define a new research area called ‘connected multimedia’, which is the study of a collection of research issues of the super-area social media that receive little attention in the literature. By connected multimedia, we mean the study of the social and technical interactions among users, multimedia data, and devices across cultures and explicitly exploiting the cultural differences. We justify why it is necessary to bring attention to this new research area and what benefits of this new research area may bring to the broader scientific research community and the humanity.

Key words

Connected multimedia Social media Socialcultural constraint 

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Copyright information

© Journal of Zhejiang University Science Editorial Office and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Zhongfei Zhang
    • 1
  • Zhengyou Zhang
    • 2
  • Ramesh Jain
    • 3
  • Yueting Zhuang
    • 4
  • Noshir Contractor
    • 5
  • Alexander G. Hauptmann
    • 6
  • Alejandro Alex Jaimes
    • 7
  • Wanqing Li
    • 8
  • Alexander C. Loui
    • 9
  • Tao Mei
    • 10
  • Nicu Sebe
    • 11
  • Yonghong Tian
    • 12
  • Vincent S. Tseng
    • 13
  • Qing Wang
    • 14
  • Changsheng Xu
    • 15
  • Huimin Yu
    • 1
  • Shiwen Yu
    • 12
  1. 1.Department of Information Science & Electronic EngineeringZhejiang UniversityHangzhouChina
  2. 2.Microsoft ResearchRedmondUSA
  3. 3.Department of Computer ScienceUniversity of CaliforniaIrvineUSA
  4. 4.College of Computer Science and TechnologyZhejiang UniversityHangzhouChina
  5. 5.School of CommunicationNorthwestern UniversityEvanstonUSA
  6. 6.Informedia GroupCMUPittsburghUSA
  7. 7.Yahoo! ResearchBarcelonaSpain
  8. 8.School of Computer Science and Software EngineeringUniversity of WollongongWollongongAustralia
  9. 9.Kodak Research LabsRochesterUSA
  10. 10.Microsoft Research AsiaBeijingChina
  11. 11.Department of Information Engineering and Computer ScienceUniversity of TrentoTrentoItaly
  12. 12.Institute of Computational LinguisticsPeking UniversityBeijingChina
  13. 13.Institute of Computer Science and InformationNational Cheng Kung UniversityTainanTaiwan
  14. 14.School of Computer ScienceNorthwestern Polytechnical UniversityXi’anChina
  15. 15.Institute of AutomationChinese Academy of SciencesBeijingChina

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