Expansion behaviour of glass aggregates in different testing for alkali-silica reactivity

Original Article

Abstract

The potential for reaction between amorphous silica in recycled glass used as aggregate in concrete and alkalis in cement is the subject of debate in current concrete literature. Whilst the ASTM C1260 accelerated mortar bar method is conventionally used for rapid ASR assessment, there is doubt about its suitability for glass aggregates. This paper reports upon a comparison of the relative ASR reactivity of various colours of recycled glass aggregates using the ASTM C1260 and C227 test methodologies. The results show that with limited exception the ASTM C1260 method does not cause glass aggregates to react by the end of the prescribed test period. In contrast, the ASTM C227 method causes all glass aggregates to react within 2 weeks, despite the test being designed for 12 months or even longer if necessary. This paper compares and contrasts the results of the two methods over a wide range of glass aggregate and cementitious systems made with two sizes of mortar bar, draws conclusions about the reasons for the differences observed and makes remarks on the expansion behaviour of glass aggregates in cementitious systems.

Keywords

ASR Glass aggregate ASTM C1260 ASTM C227 Reaction mechanisms 

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Copyright information

© RILEM 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Huiying Zhu
    • 1
  • Wen Chen
    • 2
  • Wei Zhou
    • 1
  • Ewan A. Byars
    • 3
  1. 1.GuangXi Institute of Building Research & DesignNanningPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.School of Materials Science and EngineeringWuhan University of TechnologyWuhanPeople’s Republic of China
  3. 3.Centre for Cement & Concrete, Department of Civil & Structural EngineeringThe University of SheffieldSheffieldUK

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