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Cereal Research Communications

, Volume 37, Issue 1, pp 65–73 | Cite as

Characterization of HMW Glutenin Subunits in Bread and Tetraploid Wheats by Reversed-Phase High-Performance Liquid Chromatography

  • K. Dong
  • C. Y. Hao
  • A. L. Wang
  • M. H. CaiEmail author
  • Y. M. YanEmail author
Open Access
Quality and Utilization

Abstract

The wheat storage proteins, especially the high molecular weight glutenin subunits (HMW-GS), play important roles in the determination of flour processing and bread-making quality. Compared with the traditional SDS-PAGE method, reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) was shown to have many advantages for the separation and characterization of HMW-GS because of its high resolving power, repeatability and automation. In this work, HMW-GS from bread and tetraploid wheats were separated and characterized by RP-HPLC. The elution time ranking of different HMW-GS was: 1Ax > 1Bx > 1Dx > 1By > 1Dy. Several subunit pairs associated with good quality properties and those with similar mobilities on SDS-PAGE, such as 1Bx7 and 1Bx7*, 1By8 and 1By8*, 1Dx2 and 1Ax2*, 1Bx6 and 1Bx6.1, were well separated and readily identified through RP-HPLC. However, other subunit pairs, such as 1Dy10 — 1Dy12, 1Dx5 — 1By18 and 1Dx2 — 1By16, could not be adequately separated and identified by RP-HPLC, whereas they displayed different mobilities on SDS-PAGE gels. Because 1Dx5 and 1Dx2 showed different hydrophobicities, RP-HPLC could distinguish 1Dx5 + 1Dy10 and 1Dx2 + 1Dy12. A comparative analysis between RP-HPLC and SDS-PAGE showed that a combination of both methods provided more effective identification of HMW-GS in wheat quality improvement and germplasm screening.

Keywords

wheat HMW-GS RP-HPLC 

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© Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest 2009

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Key Laboratory of Genetics and Biotechnology, College of Life Science BeijingCapital Normal University Key Laboratory of Genetics and BiotechnologyBeijingChina

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