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Cereal Research Communications

, Volume 36, Supplement 6, pp 415–419 | Cite as

Tagging pathogenicity genes in Fusarium graminearum using the transposon system mimp/impala

  • Marie Dufresne
  • Theo Van Der Lee
  • Sarrah Ben M’Barek
  • X. Xu
  • X. Zhang
  • Taiguo Liu
  • Wenwei Zhang
  • Gert H. J. Kema
  • Marie-Josée Daboussi
  • Cees Waalwijk
Session 4 Pathogenesis and Plant Pathology

Abstract

Transposon mutagenesis was applied to generate mutants in Fusarium graminearum. The mimp1/impala system originally identified in F. oxysporum proved very promising for mutagenesis as the transposon and reinserted at high frequency in (the vicinity) of genes. A collection of mutants was screened for growth, for pathogenicity and for perithecia production. Several mutants blocked in one or more functions were obtained. The wild-type phenotype of one such mutant could be restored by complementation with a non-disrupted copy of the gene. In addition reinsertions occurred on each of the four chromosomes of F. graminearum, making this system a powerful tool in the functional analyses of the > 10,000 genes predicted in the F. graminearum genome.

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Copyright information

© Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest 2008

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marie Dufresne
    • 1
  • Theo Van Der Lee
    • 2
  • Sarrah Ben M’Barek
    • 1
    • 2
  • X. Xu
    • 2
    • 3
  • X. Zhang
    • 2
    • 4
  • Taiguo Liu
    • 1
    • 5
  • Wenwei Zhang
    • 2
    • 5
  • Gert H. J. Kema
    • 2
  • Marie-Josée Daboussi
    • 1
  • Cees Waalwijk
    • 2
  1. 1.Institut de Génétique et MicrobiologieUniversité Paris-SudOrsay CedexFrance
  2. 2.Plant Research International B.V.WageningenThe Netherlands
  3. 3.Plant Protection InstituteLiaoning Academy of Agricultural SciencesShenyangChina
  4. 4.Institute of GeneticsJiangsu Academy of Agricultural SciencesNanjing, JiangsuChina
  5. 5.State Key Laboratory for Biology of Plant Diseases and Insect Pests, Institute of Plant ProtectionChinese Academy of Agriculture SciencesBeijingChina

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