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Acta Biologica Hungarica

, Volume 64, Issue 2, pp 262–265 | Cite as

Rapid Genotyping of Genetically Modified Laboratory Animals from Whole Blood Samples Without DNA Preparation

  • Á. Horváth
  • P. Sántha
  • V. Horváth
  • Nóra Török
  • I. Nagy
  • G. Jancsó
  • Cs. Vágvölgyi
  • F. SomogyváriEmail author
Short Communication

Abstract

A new, rapid method is described which permits the genotyping of genetically modified animals from a microlitre volume of whole blood samples via one step polymerase chain reaction amplification. The major advantage of the presented method is the exclusion of a DNA preparation step, which significantly reduces the time expenditure and work load of the genetic testing. Pilot studies indicate, that this method is efficient and applicable also on tissue biopsies and larger amount of blood providing a rapid and reliable new technique over conventional genotyping approaches.

Keywords

PCR genotyping direct blood mice knock-out animals 

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Copyright information

© Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest 2013

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.

Authors and Affiliations

  • Á. Horváth
    • 1
  • P. Sántha
    • 2
  • V. Horváth
    • 2
  • Nóra Török
    • 3
  • I. Nagy
    • 4
  • G. Jancsó
    • 2
  • Cs. Vágvölgyi
    • 5
  • F. Somogyvári
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of Microbiology and Immunobiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of SzegeUniversity of SzegedSzegedHungary
  2. 2.Department of Physiology, Faculty of MedicineUniversity of SzegedSzegedHungary
  3. 3.Department of Neurology, Faculty of MedicineUniversity of SzegedSzegedHungary
  4. 4.Section of Anaesthetics, Pain Medicine and Intensive Care, Department of Surgery and Cancer Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College LondonChelsea and Westminster HospitalLondonUK
  5. 5.Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Science and InformaticsUniversity of SzegedSzegedHungary

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