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International Journal of Hematology

, Volume 83, Issue 4, pp 328–330 | Cite as

Successful Eradication of Relapsed Primary Effusion Lymphoma with High-Dose Chemotherapy and Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation in a Patient Seronegative for Human Immunodeficiency Virus

  • Jong-Ho Won
  • Seung-Hyo Han
  • Sang-Byung Bae
  • Chan-Kyu Kim
  • Nam-Su Lee
  • Kyu-Taeg Lee
  • Sung-Kyu Park
  • Dae-Sik Hong
  • Dong-Wha Lee
  • Hee-Sook Park
Case Report

Abstract

Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) is a recently recognized disease that occurs most often in immunosuppressed patients, either with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or in the posttransplantation setting, and it occasionally occurs in nonim-munosuppressed patients. Patients present with lymphomatous effusions in serous cavities—pleura, pericardium, or peritoneum–without any identifiable tumor mass. PEL rarely responds to systemic chemotherapy, and the prognosis is poor, with a median survival time of less than 6 months for most cohorts. A standard treatment for PEL has not yet been identified. We describe a patient with HIV-seronegative PEL who relapsed after combination chemotherapy and then underwent successful treatment with high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) and autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT).The treatment was well tolerated, and the patient has been in remission for 12 months after HDC and ASCT.

Key words

Primary effusion lymphoma Human herpesvirus 8 High-dose chemotherapy 

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Copyright information

© The Japanese Society of Hematology 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jong-Ho Won
    • 1
  • Seung-Hyo Han
    • 1
  • Sang-Byung Bae
    • 1
  • Chan-Kyu Kim
    • 1
  • Nam-Su Lee
    • 1
  • Kyu-Taeg Lee
    • 1
  • Sung-Kyu Park
    • 1
  • Dae-Sik Hong
    • 1
  • Dong-Wha Lee
    • 2
  • Hee-Sook Park
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Hematology-Oncology, Department of Internal MedicineSoon Chun Hyang University College of MedicineSeoulKorea
  2. 2.Departments of PathologySoon Chun Hyang University College of MedicineSeoulKorea

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