International Journal of Hematology

, Volume 82, Issue 2, pp 115–118 | Cite as

Granulocyte/Macrophage Origin of Glomerular Mesangial Cells

  • Takanori Abe
  • Paul A. Fleming
  • Masahiro Masuya
  • Hitoshi Minamiguchi
  • Yasuhiro Ebihara
  • Christopher J. Drake
  • Makio Ogawa
Article

Abstract

We previously demonstrated the ability of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to generate glomerular mesangial cells by transplanting clonal populations of cells derived from a single enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-positive HSC into lethally irradiated mice. To define more precisely the hematopoietic differentiation pathway through which mesangial cells are derived, we studied the relationship between mesangial cell expression and individual hematopoietic lineages by means of a transplantation strategy. In a series of clonal HSC transplantation experiments, we generated 3 mice engrafted predominantly by granulocytes and macrophages (GMs) and 4 mice engrafted with B-cells or with B-cells and T-cells. When the kidneys of these mice were analyzed, the mice exhibiting high GM lineage engraftment revealed much higher levels of EGFP-positive mesangial cells than those with predominantly lymphocyte engraftment. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of the kidneys from a male recipient of an EGFP-positive female donor excluded cell fusion as the cause for the observed differentiation. These results support the notion that glomerular mesangial cells share their origin with GMs.

Key words

Glomerular mesangial cells Granulocytes and macrophages Transplantation Hematopoietic stem cell 

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Copyright information

© The Japanese Society of Hematology 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Takanori Abe
    • 1
    • 2
  • Paul A. Fleming
    • 3
  • Masahiro Masuya
    • 1
    • 2
  • Hitoshi Minamiguchi
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yasuhiro Ebihara
    • 1
    • 2
  • Christopher J. Drake
    • 3
  • Makio Ogawa
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Departments of Veterans Affairs Medical CenterMedical University of South CarolinaCharlestonUSA
  2. 2.Departments of MedicineMedical University of South CarolinaCharlestonUSA
  3. 3.Departments of Cell Biology and AnatomyMedical University of South CarolinaCharlestonUSA

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