International Journal of Hematology

, Volume 84, Issue 1, pp 38–42 | Cite as

Induction of erythroid-specific genes by overexpression of GATA-2 in K562 cells

  • Hideo Harigae
  • Yoko Okitsu
  • Hisayuki Yokoyama
  • Tohru Fujiwara
  • Mitsue Inomata
  • Shinichiro Takahashi
  • Naoko Minegishi
  • Mitsuo Kaku
  • Takeshi Sasaki
Progress in Hematology

Abstract

GATA transcription factors have been shown to play important roles in hematopoiesis. GATA-2 is expressed in stem and progenitor cells, and has been speculated to control the proliferation and maintain the immaturity of these cells. To examine whether the function of GATA-2 is changeable according to the differentiation stage, we established GATA-2 overexpress-ing subclones of K562, which is a leukemic cell line committed to the erythroid lineage. Via an increase in the GATA-2 expression level, the expression levels of erythroid-specific genes including a-, β-, and γ-globin were increased compared to control cells, while the expression level of GATA-1 was unchanged. Expression of the transferrin receptor was also increased in GATA-2 overexpressing K562 cells when examined by flow cytometry. In addition, the heme content of GATA-2 over-expressing K562 cells was more than 2 times higher than control cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis showed that GATA-2 protein binding to the GATA element in α-globin LCR was increased in GATA-2 overexpressing K562 cells. These findings suggest that GATA-2 could induce erythroid-specific genes without competition with GATA-1 when expressed in erythroid-committed cells, and thus further suggest that temporal and spatial regulation may be important for displaying specific functions of GATA-2.

Key words

Erythroid-specific genes GATA-2 K562 cells 

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Copyright information

© The Japanese Society of Hematology 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hideo Harigae
    • 1
  • Yoko Okitsu
    • 1
  • Hisayuki Yokoyama
    • 1
  • Tohru Fujiwara
    • 1
  • Mitsue Inomata
    • 1
  • Shinichiro Takahashi
    • 2
  • Naoko Minegishi
    • 3
  • Mitsuo Kaku
    • 2
  • Takeshi Sasaki
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Rheumatology and HematologyTohoku University Graduate School of MedicineAoba-ku, SendaiJapan
  2. 2.Departments of Infection Control and Laboratory DiagnosticsTohoku University Graduate School of MedicineSendaiJapan
  3. 3.Biomedical Engineering Research OrganizationTohoku University Graduate School of MedicineSendaiJapan

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