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International Journal of Hematology

, Volume 81, Issue 4, pp 335–341 | Cite as

The Maturation of Myeloma Cells Correlates with Sensitivity to Chemotherapeutic Agents

  • Yoshiaki Kuroda
  • Akira SakaiEmail author
  • Yoshiko Okikawa
  • Shoso Munemasa
  • Yuta Katayama
  • Hideo Hyodo
  • Jun Imagawa
  • Yasuo Takimoto
  • Hajime Okita
  • Megu Ohtaki
  • Akiro Kimura
Progress Hematology

Abstract

We analyzed both morphologic and phenotypic findings of myeloma cells before and after chemotherapy in 21 patients with multiple myeloma. The morphologic analysis was based on the Greipp classification, and phenotypic analysis was performed by 3-color flow cytometry using the CD38 plasma gating method (Marrow plasma 38). Results with flow cytometry using a combination of MPC1, CD49e, and CD45 supported the morphologic findings for the myeloma cells. Treatment with 3 or 4 cycles of VAD (vincristine, doxorubicin, and dexamethasone) therapy was effective in reducing the total numbers of myeloma cells, but the proportion of immature myeloma cells increased after this treatment. However, the immature myeloma cells were reduced by high-dose melphalan (HD-Mel) therapy followed by autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT). High-dose cyclophosphamide treatment for stem cell harvesting did not show an effect on the residual immature myeloma cells after VAD treatment. In addition, thalidomide was not effective in reducing the numbers of immature myeloma cells. These results suggest that VAD (3 or 4 cycles) therapy plus HD-Mel followed by ASCT is a reasonable treatment for multiple myeloma and that Marrow plasma 38 analysis is a useful method for monitoring the response of multiple myeloma to chemotherapy.

Key words

Greipp classification MPC1 CD49e CD45 Myeloma cells 

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Copyright information

© The Japanese Society of Hematology 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yoshiaki Kuroda
    • 1
  • Akira Sakai
    • 1
    Email author
  • Yoshiko Okikawa
    • 1
  • Shoso Munemasa
    • 1
  • Yuta Katayama
    • 1
  • Hideo Hyodo
    • 1
  • Jun Imagawa
    • 3
  • Yasuo Takimoto
    • 3
  • Hajime Okita
    • 3
  • Megu Ohtaki
    • 2
  • Akiro Kimura
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of Hematology and Oncology, Division of Clinical Research, Research Institute for Radiation Biology and MedicineHiroshima UniversityHiroshimaJapan
  2. 2.Departments of Environmetrics and Biometrics, Research Institute for Radiation Biology and MedicineHiroshima UniversityHiroshima
  3. 3.Internal MedicineOtake National HospitalOtakeJapan

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