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Sexuality Research & Social Policy

, Volume 4, Issue 1, pp 15–26 | Cite as

The sexual lives of lesbian, gay, and bisexual people with disabilities: Psychological perspectives

  • Sarah S. Fraley
  • Linda R. Mona
  • Peter S. Theodore
Special Issue Articles

Abstract

People with disabilities (PWD) who identify as lesbian, gay, or bisexual (LGB) represent a population that has received little attention in the areas of social policy, sexuality studies, and psychological research and practice. Existing research, especially from psychological perspectives, has focused mostly on sexual identity and internal psychological dimensions rather than on actual physical experiences and sexual expression. Awareness of the unique needs and concerns of these individuals is crucial for optimizing their physical and mental well-being, especially for those who provide mental health services for those who identify as LGB PWD. This article presents these issues from a multicultural perspective, viewing this population as a double minority with some experiences similar to those of other minority groups. Further, it provides a practical view of barriers to sexual expression for LGB PWD along with strategies for overcoming them and describes suggestions for further work in advocacy, social policy, and research.

Key words

sexuality sexual functioning sexual expression accessibility social policy 

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Copyright information

© Springer 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Behavioral Health (06/116-B), VA Long Beach Healthcare SystemLong Beach
  2. 2.Friends Research InstituteLos Angeles

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