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On bodies and research: Transgender issues in health and HIV research articles

  • Rita M. Melendez
  • Lathem A. Bonem
  • Robert Sember
Special Issue Articles

Abstract

Transgender bodies are difficult to categorize because the numerous and varied names transgender people use to describe themselves reflect myriad body formations. This diversity among transgender individuals poses challenges to health researchers, and results from previous studies have urged researchers to examine the needs of diverse transgender populations, especially with regard to HIV. However, to date no systematic review of transgender research has been done. This article reviews 354 article abstracts on transgender health research for general trends and examines 63 research articles on transgender HIV issues for sample size, comparison groups, and methodologies employed. The trends in focus and number of articles suggest that new approaches to research need to be utilized in future research regarding transgender health care issues.

Key words

gender dysphoria gender identity disorder transsexual transvestite FTM MTF HIV prevention 

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Copyright information

© Springer 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rita M. Melendez
    • 1
  • Lathem A. Bonem
    • 1
  • Robert Sember
    • 2
  1. 1.Center for Research on Gender and SexualitySan Francisco State UniversitySan Francisco
  2. 2.Department of Sociomedical Sciences, Mailman School of Public HealthColumbia UniversityNew York

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