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Acta Geophysica

, Volume 64, Issue 2, pp 417–442 | Cite as

New Methods for Modeling Laterolog Resistivity Corrections

  • Jadwiga Anna Jarzyna
  • Adam Cichy
  • Dezső Drahos
  • Attila Galsa
  • Maria Joanna Bała
  • Andrzej Ossowski
Open Access
Acta Geophysica

Abstract

The paper presents methods for laterolog response modeling. In Coulomb’s charges method, Laplace’s equation is solved for the electric field distribution in rock medium with internal boundaries between different resistivity layers. There, the boundary problem is reduced to Fred-holm integral equation of the second kind. The second method uses a finite element array to model apparent resistivity from laterolog. The task is treated as DC problem and the Laplace equation is solved numerically. The presented methods were applied to borehole data covering a typical stratigraphie section of the Fore-Sudetic Monocline in southwestern Poland. Apparent resistivity was calculated using the Coulomb’s charges method and alternatively modeled using a finite element method which gave similar results. Then, a series of linear corrections for borehole, shoulder bed, and filtration effects for apparent resistivity obtained by the Coulomb’s charges method demonstrated the feasibility of calculating true resistivity of virgin and invaded zones. The proposed methods provide a flexible solution in modeling which can be adapted to other logs.

Key words

laterolog response Coulomb’s charges method finite element modeling apparent resistivity correction 

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Copyright information

© Jarzyna et al. 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jadwiga Anna Jarzyna
    • 1
  • Adam Cichy
    • 1
  • Dezső Drahos
    • 2
  • Attila Galsa
    • 2
  • Maria Joanna Bała
    • 1
  • Andrzej Ossowski
    • 1
  1. 1.AGH University of Science and TechnologyFaculty of Geology, Geophysics and Environment ProtectionKrakowPoland
  2. 2.Eötvös Lorând UniversityDepartment of Geophysics and Space SciencesBudapestHungary

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