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Effect of a 12-Week Mixed Training on Body Quality in People Living with HIV: Does Age and HIV Duration Matter?

  • Clinical Trials and Therapeutics
  • Original Research
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Abstract

Background

The impact of HIV duration on exercise adaptations has not yet been studied. Moreover, the age at which subjects living with HIV are the most responsive to exercise is not clear.

AIMS

Investigate the effect of a mixed exercise training program on physical performance changes in individuals living with HIV and explore if age or HIV duration influence these adaptations in men.

Methods

In this feasibility study, participants followed a 12-week mixed exercise training program, three times/week, 45 min/session. Physical performance including functional capacities (normal 4-m walking test, 6min walking test), grip strength (hand dynamometer), muscle power, body composition (android and gynoid fat masses, appendicular lean mass) were evaluated pre- and post-intervention. Subgroup analysis according to the median age of the participants (age<50yrs vs. age≥50yrs) and median HIV duration (HIV<20yrs vs. HIV≥20yrs) were performed in men.

Results

A total of 27 participants (age: 54.5±6.8yrs, men: 85%; HIV duration: 19.3±7.6yrs) were included. At the end of the intervention, significant increases compared to baseline were seen in grip strength (p=0.017), leg power (p<0.001), normal walking speed (p<0.001) and 6-min walking distance (p=0.003). Following the intervention, parameters improved similarly in both age groups. However improvement was greater in those with HIV>20yrs than those with a shorter infection duration, with change (%) on total (p<0.001), android (p=0.02), and gynoid (p=0.05) fat masses as well as appendicular lean mass index (p=0.03).

Conclusion

Mixed exercise training seems to be an effective intervention to improve physical performance in individuals living with HIV. In addition, this study suggests that neither age nor HIV duration has influence on the effect of mixed training in this population.

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Funding

Funding: This research did not receive any specific grant from funding agencies in the public, commercial, or not-for-profit sectors. FB and MAL are supported by FRQS.

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Correspondence to Mylene Aubertin-Leheudre.

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Conflict of Interest: We have no Conflict of Interest.

Informed consent: All participants gave written informed consent.

Ethical Statement details: Full agreement with ethical standards.

Ethical approval: The ethics approval was obtained from the McGill University Health Centre (MUHC) and from the research ethics review committee at the Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM).

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Buckinx, F., Granet, J., Bass, A. et al. Effect of a 12-Week Mixed Training on Body Quality in People Living with HIV: Does Age and HIV Duration Matter?. J Frailty Aging 11, 426–433 (2022). https://doi.org/10.14283/jfa.2022.56

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.14283/jfa.2022.56

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