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Effects of excessive copper intake on hematological and hemorheological parameters

Abstract

Copper plays an important role in the structure and function of metalloproteins and in the absorption of iron. The present study deals with the effects of excessive copper intake on hematological and hemorheological parameters.

Drinking water containing 250 µg/mL copper for a period of 9 wk, Wistar albino rats showed increased erythrocyte count, blood viscosity, and hematocrit values (p<0.05) and lower hemoglobin (p<0.05) than controls fed a normal diet. The two groups also had differences in the erythrocyte deformability index.

The results suggest that excessive copper intake results in hematological and hemorheological changes affecting both the protein content of the erythrocyte membrane and heme synthesis.

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Özçelik, D., Toplan, S., Özdemir, S. et al. Effects of excessive copper intake on hematological and hemorheological parameters. Biol Trace Elem Res 89, 35–42 (2002). https://doi.org/10.1385/BTER:89:1:35

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1385/BTER:89:1:35

Index Entries

  • Copper
  • trace elements
  • erythrocyte deformability
  • blood viscosity
  • hematological parameters