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Biological Trace Element Research

, Volume 110, Issue 1, pp 79–94 | Cite as

Contents of metals in some wild mushrooms

Its impact in human health
  • Hasan Hüseyin Doĝan
  • Murad Aydin Şanda
  • Refik Uyanöz
  • Celaleddin Öztürk
  • Ümmühan Çetin
Article

Abstract

The concentrations of 7 metals (lead, cadmium, manganese, copper, nickel, silver, and chromium) were determined in 32 different species of wild mushrooms. The mushroom samples, which have been using for food and some medical purposes, were collected from Konya, an Inner Anatolian region of Turkey. The highest metal concentrations were determined as 39 mg/kg Pb and 3.72 mg/kg Cd in Trichaptum abietinum 467 mg/kg Mn in Panaeolus sphinctrinus, 326 mg/kg Cu in Trametes versicolor, 69.4 mg/kg Ni in Helvella spadicea, 6.97 mg/kg Ag in Agaricus campestris, and 84.5 mg/kg Cr in Phellinus igniarius. The maximum contents are 1.52, 2.22, and 60.2 mg/kg in Pleurotus eryngii (for Pb), Amanita vaginata (for Cd), and Helvella leucomelana (for Cu), respectively. These results were compared according to the WHO/FAO standard.

Index Entries

Human health metal mushrooms toxicity 

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Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hasan Hüseyin Doĝan
    • 1
  • Murad Aydin Şanda
    • 1
  • Refik Uyanöz
    • 2
  • Celaleddin Öztürk
    • 1
  • Ümmühan Çetin
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Biology, Science and Art FacultySelcuk UniversityKonyaTurkey
  2. 2.Department of Soil, Agricultural FacultySelcuk UniversityKonyaTurkey

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