Immunologic Research

, Volume 36, Issue 1–3, pp 247–254 | Cite as

Human tumor-derived vs dendritic cell-derived exosomes have distinct biologic roles and molecular profiles

Article

Abstract

Microvesicles (MV) or exosomes are produced and secreted by tumor and normal cells. The molecular profile and functions of tumor-derived vs dendritic cell (DC)-derived MV are distinct. The former express death ligands and mediate apoptosis of activated T cells. The latter promote CD4+T cell proliferation and may play a role in regulating T cell responses. Serving as intercellular communication networks, tumor-derived MV contribute to tumor escape, while DC-derived MV drive and regulate immune response.

Key Words

Exosomes Microvesicles Human tumors Dendritic cells T cells Apoptosis 

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Copyright information

© Human Press Inc 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Pathology, Immunology and OtolaryngologyUniversity of Pittsburgh School of MedicinePittsburghUSA
  2. 2.Hillman Cancer CenterUniversity of Pittsburgh Cancer InstitutePittsburgh

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