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Immunologic Research

, Volume 21, Issue 2–3, pp 279–288 | Cite as

Targeted cytokines for cancer immunotherapy

  • Holger N. Lode
  • Ralph A. Reisfeld
Article

Abstract

Targeting of cytokines into the tumor microenvironment using antibody-cytokine fusion proteins, called immunocytokines, represents a novel approach in cancer immunotherapy. This article summarizes therapeutic efficacy and immune mechanisms involved in targeting interleukin-2 (IL-2) to neuroectodermal, tumors using ganglioside GD2-specific antibody-IL-2 fusion protein (ch14.18-IL-2). Treatment of established melanoma metastases with ch14.18-IL-2 resulted in eradication of disease followed by a vaccination effect protecting mice from lethal challenges, with wild-type tumor calls. In a syngeneic neuroblastoma model, targeted IL-2 was effective in the amplification of a weak memory immune response previously induced by IL-12 gene therapy using an engineered linear version of this heterodimeric cytokine. These findings show that targeted IL-2 may provide an effective tool in cancer immunotherapy and establish the missing link between T cell-mediated, vaccination and objective clinical responses.

Key Words

Neuroblastoma Melanoma Immunotherapy Immunocytokines Interleukin-2 T cell memory 

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Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc. 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Holger N. Lode
    • 1
  • Ralph A. Reisfeld
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Immunology, R218, IMM13The Scripps Research InstituteLa Jolla

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