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Biological Trace Element Research

, Volume 104, Issue 1, pp 83–91 | Cite as

Effect of nano-TiO2 on strength of naturally aged seeds and growth of spinach

  • Lei Zheng
  • Fashui Hong
  • Shipeng Lu
  • Chao Liu
Original Articles

Abstract

The effects of nano-TiO2 (rutile) and non-nano-TiO2 on the germination and growth of naturally aged spinach seeds were studied by measuring the germination rate and the germination and vigor indexes of aged spinach seeds. An increase of these factors was observed at 0.25–4‰ nano-TiO2 treatment. During the growth stage, the plant dry weight was increased, as was the chlorophyll formation, the ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase activity, and the photosynthetic rate. The best results were found at 2.5‰ nano-TiO2.

The effects of non-nano-TiO2 are not significant. It is shown that the physiological effects are related to the nanometer-size particles, but the mechanism by which nano-TiO2 improves the growth of spinach seeds still needs further study.

Index Entries

Nano-TiO2 spinach aged seed seed vigor photosynthesis 

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Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lei Zheng
    • 1
  • Fashui Hong
    • 1
  • Shipeng Lu
    • 1
  • Chao Liu
    • 1
  1. 1.College of Life SciencesSuzhou UniversitySuzhouPeople's Republic of China

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